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UUCOC Events Calendar

June 2019
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At the suggestion of the Reverend Bob Raible of First Unitarian Church, members who lived in Oak Cliff held monthly Sunday evening potluck suppers in various homes starting in the fall of 1950 to get acquainted with each other and discuss the idea of forming a Fellowship in Oak Cliff.

It was a daring thing to do. We had to decide whether we could handle RE classes for the children on our own without the benefit of Ruth Clark’s guidance (she was First Church RE Director), could we conduct Sunday services for the adults that would be satisfactory? Could we locate a place to meet and raise enough money to pay the rent and utilities?

We finally decided it was worthwhile and possible. Meeting in a garage/studio on South Hampton we voted to form, elected a slate of officers, and adopt a statement of purpose. On May 2nd, in a meeting room of Oak Cliff Bank, 31 members signed the charter asking to become officially recognized as a Unitarian congregation.

On May 15th at a national meeting, the Unitarian and Universalist Associations voted to merge the two denominations. Bob Raible persuaded them to put the acceptance of our charter at the head of the list of applications, and we became the first chartered Unitarian Universalist Association.

Over the summer, a vacant rental house at 1029 North Zangs, near Lake Cliff Park, was located and renovated (cleaning, repainting, acoustic shells added), all work done by the enthusiastic members. Children’s classrooms would be on the second floor. One week before the opening date in September, the city building inspector announced that we could not use the second floor for gatherings as it did not have adequate fire protection, so some hasty plans were made to have classes in a room adjacent to the sanctuary which made for a noisy background.

Opening the Sunday after Labor Day in 1961, the first Sunday attendance was: Church School 28, Adult Service 35. First year budget was $4,454. Noting a deserted building next door, some leaders tracked down the owner and convinced him that it would be to his advantage to let us use and maintain it rather than let it stay vacant, so we acquired the use of another dirty, more run down building for RE classes. We cleaned it but did not do any renovations and did not have any utilities there (no heat) but were happy to be able to expand a bit.